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Historic Nickel Plate Railroad Locomotives to Reunite in Bellevue

By Events, News

Historic steam locomotives and train rides to be feature of late summer event

BELLEVUE, OHIO (July 20th) – The Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society and the Mad River & NKP Railroad Museum are proud to announce Berkshires in Bellevue, a special series of events from September 24th through October 3rd featuring the reunion of historic 1940’s steam locomotives no. 765 and no. 757.

“Bellevue was once home to the largest railroad terminal on the Nickel Plate Road and we’re excited to honor the history of our community by bringing these iconic machines back together,” said Chris Beamer, Mad River president. “It will be the first time since 2013 that the 765 has operated at the Museum and we’re eager to collaborate with our friends from Fort Wayne to welcome hundreds of visitors to our community.”

Featuring steam-powered caboose rides, cab rides, hands-on experiences, dinner and breakfast buffets, and an exclusive night photo session featuring the 765 and 757, this event is ideal for railroad fans and families alike. Click here to purchase tickets.

The Berkshire-type locomotive emerged as one of the most technologically advanced and popular locomotive designs in the 20th Century and is most associated with the New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, commonly known as the Nickel Plate Road. The high-speed, high-horsepower Berkshires were heralded as “the engines that saved a railroad,” and were a common sight along the railroad line between Fort Wayne, Indiana, Bellevue, Ohio, and across the Nickel Plate system.

Nickel Plate Road steam locomotive no. 765 was originally placed on display in Fort Wayne, Indiana as a monument to a railroad elevation project and later restored to operation by the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society in 1972. Since then, the 765 has become one of the most popular railroad attractions of its kind in the world, welcoming passengers and visitors from all 50 states and six countries.

Out of 80 Berkshires built for the Nickel Plate, six of these engines were preserved after the railroad transitioned to diesel locomotives. After efforts to find a home for it in Bellevue did not materialize in the late 1960s. the 757 was relocated to the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania (RRMPA) in Strasburg, Pennsylvania. Thanks to the tireless advocacy of Mad River volunteers, the RRMPA agreed to transfer ownership of the 757 to Mad River in 2019. Soon after, the engine had its very own homecoming in Bellevue for permanent display where it joins over 50 pieces of railroad equipment and historic displays. Plans call for the locomotive to be cosmetically restored.

Berkshires in Bellevue Dates

BOOK YOUR TICKETS NOW

Friday, September 24th

Hostler Experience

Saturday, September 25th

Caboose Rides
Berkshire Dinner Buffet

Sunday, September 26th

Berkshire Breakfast
Caboose Rides

Friday, October 1, 2021

Hostler Experience
Night Photo Session

Saturday, October 2, 2021

Caboose Rides
FWRHS/Mad River Members Banquet
Members Night Photo Session

Sunday, October 3, 2021

Berkshire Breakfast
Caboose Rides

Berkshires in Bellevue Events & Experiences

All events take place at 253 Southwest St, Bellevue, Ohio, 44811

Caboose Rides

These 20-minute train rides will let passengers experience the sights and sounds of Nickel Plate Road steam locomotive no. 765 up close and personal from aboard a unique vantage point: inside a genuine Nickel Plate Road caboose! Bring the family and ride along like railroad crews did in the 1950s. Trains depart every 30 minutes. Tickets range from $10.00 – $25.00.

Cab Rides

Climb aboard the cab of steam locomotive no. 765 during for a 20-minute ride with the fireman and engineer. Tickets are $50.00. Space is limited.

Night Photo Session

For amateur and professional photographers alike, enjoy an extended opportunity to photograph no. 765, no. 757, and other historic railroad equipment, actors, vintage automobiles, and props in action under professionally lit scenes throughout the museum grounds in set-ups uniquely created for this event. Lighting provided by Chris Lantz Photography. Tickets are $175.00 per person. Space is limited.

Hostler Experience

Join the ranks of a mainline steam locomotive crew and help prepare the 765 for the day’s run. You’ll learn how to awaken the 765’s firebox, service the locomotive’s appliances and running gear, and enjoy exclusive, behind-the-scenes access to the 765 and its cab for an 8-hour experience. Tickets are $284.00 per person. Space is limited.

Berkshire Breakfast

Held in the newly constructed Mary Cooper Restoration building, this banquet-style breakfast will feature Nickel Plate Road no. 765 under steam and no. 757 on display inside the building. Diesel-powered caboose rides will be held for attendees. Tickets are $65.00.

Berkshire Dinner Buffet

Catered by Bone Boy’s BBQ & Catering and held in the newly constructed Mary Cooper Restoration building, this buffet-style dinner will feature Nickel Plate Road no. 765 under steam and no. 757 on display inside the building. Diesel-powered caboose rides will be held for attendees. Tickets are $75.00.

Museum Admission

Tour the Mad River & NKP Museum and explore its detailed displays, exhibits and vintage railroad equipment. Admission is $8.00 with any event or train ride ticket or $10.00 if purchased separately.

Railroad Society Announces 2021 Season

By Events, Excursions, Uncategorized

NEW HAVEN (July 15th) – The Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society (FWRHS) has announced its 2021 slate of events and excursions, the return of historic steam locomotive No. 765 to the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad in Cleveland, Ohio, and the operation of the Autumn Colors Express in Huntington West Virginia.

“After hosting a successful but limited capacity event last October, we’re looking forward to the opportunity to educate and entertain the general public aboard our attractions once again,” said Joe Knapke, FWRHS President. “We’re grateful that our members, donors, and volunteers helped us weather 2020’s uncertainties.”

Nickel Plate Road locomotive no. 765 will be under steam at the Annual Open House in New Haven, Indiana in August, and operate over three weeks for Steam in the Valley at the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic on September 3rd, 10th-12th, 17th-19th. Tickets for Steam in the Valley go on sale July 20th at cvsr.com at 9 AM.

Exclusive Throttle Time tickets will permit railroad fans to operate the iconic steam engine on September 13th for a six-mile round trip. Throttle Time ticket sales begin July 21st at 12 PM for FWRHS members and 6 PM for the general public at fortwaynerailroad.org.

Society members will also be co-hosting the Autumn Colors Express from October 21st through 24th. These all-day first-class passenger trains will carry passengers through the heart of the New River Gorge National Park during peak fall color. Tickets for these diesel-powered excursions are available now at autumncolorexpresswv.com.

The Society’s annual events in New Haven include the Railroad Open House and train rides on August 20th – 22nd and the Pumpkin Train on October 9th and 10th. This year, the 19th Annual Santa Train will return one week earlier on November 27th and operate the next three weekends in December, giving passengers more opportunities to take a train ride with Santa Claus. Ticket sales begin November 3rd.

The FWRHS is also teaming up with the Mad River & NKP Museum in Bellevue, Ohio for Berkshires in Bellevue –  two weekends of events between September 24th and October 3rd. Bellevue and Fort Wayne were once major terminals for the Nickel Plate Road, and the 765 will operate train rides and special events at the museum to honor the community’s heritage as a railroad town.

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Earlier this year, Society volunteers completed an extensive restoration of a century-old Wabash Railroad caboose, which will expand capacity for the organization’s popular train rides and offerings. In addition to the caboose, volunteers are in the final stage in the restoration of vintage Nickel Plate Road diesel locomotive no. 358. The classic diesel locomotive will be used on regional tourist railroads and in tandem exhibition and excursion with the 765.

Volunteers also continue to make meaningful progress on the rebuild of a one-of-a-kind Lake Erie & Western freight car, with a fundraising goal of $3,500 to complete the project. Donations can be made online at fortwaynerailroad.org/donate.

Steam Right On – An Inspiring Steam Revival

By Uncategorized

In May of 1958, the steam locomotive had less than 60 days of life left on the New York, Chicago, and St. Louis Railroad.

In Conneaut, Ohio, the slow march toward obsolescence wore on inside the railroad’s shop near South Jackon Street. Sometime that month, it would complete the last overhaul of one of its storied Berkshire-type steam locomotives – an engine numbered 759.

Despite the railroad’s re-investment in the locomotive, its “superpowered” ability to hustle and bustle commerce across the Midwest, and the belief that steam could still play a limited role were it not for an economic recession, the engine would never turn another wheel for the what was more commonly known as the Nickel Plate Road.

A few weeks later in June, the outdated technology that had steadily guided the company for over 70 years would cease. The flame would extinguish entirely that winter when a stored steam engine numbered 765 was fired up for a stranded passenger train in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and as a few yard engines loped around Bellevue, Ohio to fill-in amidst their diesel-powered replacements.

In the late 1950s and early 60s, a variety of retired engines had been plucked from the scrap line, destined to become city monuments or encounter other fates – Nickel Plate Mikado-types went to Hammond and Indianapolis, Indiana, and Bloomington, Illinois; one Hudson went to St. Louis and two others to a private owner; but the Berkshires, still listed as “stored serviceable” on the company roster, languished around the system. In 1962, F. Nelson Blount purchased the 759 for his collection at Steamtown USA, a swelling museum collection of itinerant steam locomotives located in New Hampshire, and later relocated to Bellows Falls, Vermont.

NKP 2-8-4 759

Not long after, a collection of steam history enthusiasts which comprised the High Iron Company had sprung up operating steam excursions in the East. “HiCo” was determined to celebrate the centennial of the Transcontinental Railroad a short time away in 1969. They knew that pulling a massive, barnstorming, cross-country steam excursion required a superpower. They needed the 759.

The engine was leased from Steamtown, only to find itself relocated back to Conneaut. There, the Nickel Plate’s successor Norfolk & Western permitted the engine back to where it had originally left in like-new condition only ten years earlier. In just a few months, the engine was tuned up and repaired by a menagerie of teenagers, investors, former Nickel Platers, and dozens of others. By August of 1968, the 759 was alive again.

For several years, the 759 romped around the general railroad system, racking up thousands of miles between New Jersey, Kansas City, Roanoke, Horsehoe Curve, Cumberland, Jim Thorpe, and beyond, operating specials, charters, and excursions with paying passengers and diehards in attendance by the thousands.

With its signature gravelly whistle spreading its melody over different time zones, it pulled most of the eastern leg of the 1969 Golden Spike Centennial Limited and the last Norfolk & Western passenger train before Amtrak took over in 1971.

The 759 handily showcasing superpower at Horseshoe Curve during its brief, new life.

The 759 tapped into a cultural zeitgeist in more ways than one. Amid the Golden Spike trips and elsewhere, the engine traveled through a handful of towns in Indiana and Ohio, where it proved to an unorganized group of young railroad fans that a mainline, superpowered steam locomotive like no. 759 could actually be restored. It could actually be done.

In Fort Wayne that group would soon convalesce around a monument in a city park that bore a special resemblance to the 759.

Shortly after the 759 had been selected for Steamtown, five other Berkshires found their own paths to preservation. As the 759 arrived in New Hampshire, the Nickel Plate Road readied sister engine no. 765 for display in Fort Wayne’s Lawton Park in 1964. The 765 had been the last Berkshire under steam for the railroad, whereas the 759 had been the last one overhauled. The two engines had unwittingly become 400-ton bookends in the library of steam locomotive history.

Enchanted by the smell of coal smoke and the success of The High Iron Company, the merry band of advocates formed the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society in 1972 with the intention to preserve, restore and operate the 765. Before the 765 would ever turn a wheel under its own power again in 1979, the 759’s brief career was over, but the engine’s inspiration and members of its very crew would carry the Fort Wayne organization toward realizing their dream. To help, the Society acquired a 16mm print of Steam Right On, a lovingly crafted, 18-minute documentary showcasing the 759’s own revival.

Filmed by Michael Autorino, narrated by Alan Frank, and produced by a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the film’s soundtrack interchanges the imagined “voice” of the 759 with commentary from its crew members, all set against a plucky, folksy guitar track, professional, vivid cinematography, with excited, montage-style editing. It feels a little dated, but in a way that is charmingly so. “Come to think of it, who’s more suited to whistle-stop campaigning than I am?” asks the narrator.

While we see plenty of the 759’s crew at work, the filmmaker makes a distinctive creative choice to never use traditionally shot interviews or “talking heads.” We hear only the “voice” of the 759 and the evocative remarks from her laborers. The variety of footage is also striking – with glimpses of Ridgeley, West Virginia coming out to welcome the 759 on the Western Maryland Railroad and coverage of the 759’s long climb up the Middle Division of Penn Central over Horseshoe Curve.

A custom cut of the film was created by the Society for use in fundraising for the 765. At the tail end of the reel, footage of the 765’s crew is spliced in, showing them hard at work wrangling the 765 back to life in a section entitled “PROJECT 765.”

The footage plays out silently, meant to be narrated in-person by its presenters, wherever the 765’s crew was giving a much-needed pitch. While the High Iron Company had been funded by investors like Ross Rowland, the Fort Wayne group had settled their efforts in a modest field, without a shop facility like Calumet, and with only a grassroots donation campaign underway.

By 1979, the 765 was successfully restored, but the 759’s time had passed. When the Society shared Steam Right On, no one knew that the passing of the torch had already occurred. Suffering several mechanical issues, it was returned to Bellows Falls where it rested until it was relocated into the reorganized Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 1984. For twenty years, the 765 would nonetheless follow its example, operating for Norfolk & Western’s successor Norfolk Southern, crossing the Mississippi River, gliding through the New River Gorge, climbing Horsehoe Curve, and marching into downtown Chicago in passenger excursion and public exhibition service, delighting millions of people from around the world.

In 2015, the 765 was welcomed to Steamtown for a series of special events – and for the first time since the late 1950s, two Nickel Plate Berkshires sat side-by-side in a roundhouse together. In steam preservation, where so many pieces of equipment were once scattered to the wind, the idea that two large mainline locomotives of the same class, same railroad, same type, same-nearly-everything, would co-exist together is a rarity. The bookends had finally met.

Bookends.

The 759’s role as a teaching tool has extended far beyond Conneaut or Steamtown.

It taught a new generation that it could be done.

But why’d they do it?

We should let 759 answer:

“Why do they do it? What causes their admiration? Where did their love begin? Where does it come from, this fascination that men have for me? My kind? The enthusiasm and admiration transcend time. Whether in a big city or a small town, the people turn out. Some, perhaps, with nostalgic memories of their youth. Still others with a youthful curiosity to see me first hand, for the first time…Well, let’s just say that this country and we grew hand in hand. We made an impression on each other. And each was better for it.”

Restoration of historic Wabash caboose completed

By Uncategorized

The Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society, Inc (FWRHS) has completed an extensive rebuild of its historic, century-old Wabash Railroad caboose no. 2534 – one of only two wooden Wabash cabooses in existence.

Once on display in Fort Wayne’s Swinney Park in 1957, the caboose and Wabash steam locomotive no. 534 were part of a monument installed by the Tri-State Railroad Community Committee, a consortium of area railroad employees. In 1984, the display was relocated to the FWRHS in New Haven.

While the caboose was used occasionally in events and operations in New Haven, its condition had deteriorated after 60 years of exposure to the elements. In 2018, project manager David “DJ” DePanicis, a school director from the Youngstown, Ohio region, determined that his woodworking background would enable him to take on the project in a leadership role.

With donations from members and the general public, in addition to assistance from the Wabash Railroad Historical Society, DePanicis and a team of over a dozen regular volunteers steadily disassembled and rebuilt the caboose over three years and committed over 5,000 hours to the effort. 90% of the structure was replaced and over 1,000 pieces of new lumber were used in the effort, including several curved and arched beams that were hand-made for the interior roof.

“We have such a great variety of people at the Society. Whether you have carpentry skills, are just providing general labor, or have just a love of history, our projects are the kind that anyone can lend a hand in, regardless of skills,” remarked DePanicis. “Restoring a caboose is a lot like building a house with your best friends.”

Generally, cabooses were used by train crews on freight trains to supervise their train and shipments en-route. Due to the long hours involved in the trade, they were often outfitted with desks, tables, beds, stoves, washbasins, and water closet and customized by their employees. This particular caboose was outfitted with a coal-fired stove cast in a Fort Wayne foundry. The caboose contains a combination of original kerosene and new and donated electric lamps for nighttime illumination and a pair of original Wabash Railroad marker lights were also donated to the project.

Wabash caboose no. 2534 will continue to serve in an educational and entertainment capacity, hosting families aboard the organization’s popular Santa Train and other seasonal events. The caboose’s counterpart, steam locomotive no. 534, is currently undergoing preparation for a restoration of its own sometime in the future.

2020 Santa Train Announcement

By News

Out of concern for our patrons and volunteers  – and in consultation with old Saint Nick himself – the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society has decided not to operate its Santa Train this December. 

This decision was reached after reviewing numerous financial, logistical, and health-related concerns, and also in discussions with our rail tourism partners in Indiana. It has been made in the interest of public safety and in deference to state guidelines on public gatherings.

“The Santa Train is a family-friendly event, and the unique, cherished experience with Santa aboard our historic train is the highlight,” stated Society vice-president Kelly Lynch. 

“While we explored several alternative experiences, COVID-19’s impact on our Allen County is burdening our local health care community, and the number of cases continues to rise. Ultimately we determined that it was in the best interest of everyone to withdraw the event for the year,” Lynch said. 

The Santa Train has also become an important annual fundraiser for the organization, and its annulment represents a notable financial loss. 

Donations to offset this financial loss can be made online at fortwaynerailroad.org. Additionally, several Christmas items will be made available through the organization’s online store in December.

The Santa Train has become one of the community’s favorite traditions for over 20 years, welcoming thousands of people each season from the tri-state region. Its origins began over 70 years ago with the Pennsylvania Railroad and Wolf and Dessauer Santa Train which visited Fort Wayne each season.

Outdoor Autumn Railroad Festival Announced for October

By Events

Updated 10/1: All Pumpkin Train Tickets are sold out. General Admission tickets are required for entry. All tickets must be purchased in advance.

On October 1st through the 4th, this admission-only event will offer socially distanced train rides, vintage steam locomotive no. 765 operating for the enjoyment of attendees, historic railroad displays, and locally-owned food trucks.

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